Oregon State University

MA Faculty

Chris Anderson

Chris Anderson
Professor of English

Chris Anderson’s graduate work was in rhetoric and composition, and for twenty years he coordinated the composition program at Oregon State.  He now teaches a range of courses in writing, pedagogy, and literature in translation.  His early focus was the essay.  Since being ordained a Catholic deacon, he has developed a strong interest in the Bible as Literature, Dante, Spiritual Autobiography, and the relationship of religion and literature in general.  What he teaches in all his classes are ways of reading, with an emphasisChris Anderson on personal response, and ways of writing, with an emphasis on alternate forms, particularly freewriting, journals, and collage.  He has written, co-written, or edited fourteen books in a variety of genres and on a variety of subjects, including Free/Style: A Direct Approach to Writing (Houghton Mifflin, 1992); Edge Effects: Notes from an Oregon Forest (Iowa, 1993), a finalist for the Oregon Book Award in creative nonfiction; and Teaching as Believing: Faith in the University (Baylor, 2004).  He has also published two books of poetry, My Problem with the Truth (Cloudbank, 2003), and most recently, The Next Thing Always Belongs (Airlie, 2011), and he is a member of Airlie Press, a shared-work poetry collaborative, one of only two writers collaboratives on the West Coast.


Richmond Barbour

Richmond Barbour
Professor of English

Richmond Barbour has taught English literature at Oregon State University since 1992. He specializes in Shakespeare, Renaissance literature and culture, theater history, travel writing, cross-cultural relations, and oceanic history. He also regularly teaches Classical Mythology and Classical Drama. His research interests have ranged from Ben Jonson and London’s print culture, to the relations between England’s theatrical and maritime industries in Shakespeare’s day, to the birth of the London East India Company and the emergence of global corporate power. Richmond BarbourHis publications include Before Orientalism. London’s theatre of the East, 1576-1626 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), The Third Voyage Journals: Writing and Performance in the London East India Company, 1607-10 (New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2009), and articles in the Huntington Library Quarterly, PMLA, Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Criticism, and (currently forthcoming) Clio. He has won numerous grants for research at the British Library and the Huntington Library. His current projects include editing a volume of Richard Hakluyt’s Principal Navigations (1598-1600), preparing a scholarly edition of a 1611-12 East India Company journal, and writing a book on the Company’s first generation.


Peter Betjemann

Peter Betjemann
Associate Professor of English
Graduate Coordinator

Peter Betjemann teaches American literature from its origins to the present, while specializing as a researcher in the period between 1840 and 1925. His work as a cabinetmaker’s assistant during his years as a student sparked his academic interest in the lexicons of the “artisanal” – today a familiar way of talking about everything from cheeses and coffee to mass-marketed decorative styles – as they developed in the nineteenth century. He is the author of Talking Shop: The Language of Craft in an Age of Consumption (University of Virginia Press, 2011), and publishes on Peter Betjemannliterature and the decorative arts in such journals as Word and Image, American Literary Realism, and The Journal of Design History.

His two current projects address the Progressive era. The first focuses on the influence of the British science fiction writer and socialist H.G. Wells on such writers as Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Willa Cather; an article called "Willa Cather's Time Machine: H.G. Wells, Alexander's Bridge, and Aesthetic Temporality" is forthcoming in the collection Cather and Aestheticism. A book in progress, Betjemann's second current project, describes how writers, speakers, and activists associated with progressivism described social, political, and ideological "designs" through metaphor and iconography originally belonging to the decorative arts.


Neil Davison

Neil Davison
Associate Professor of English

A member of the Department since 1995, Neil Davison teaches courses in British Modernist Literature, works of James Joyce, 19th-and 20th-century Irish literature, Jewish cultural studies, 20th–century poetry, and Holocaust literature and film. In both his classroom and scholarship, he focuses on Enlightenment Modernity’s constructs of racial, gender, and religious identities, and how these inform the aesthetics and politics of nineteenth and twentieth-century texts. His work has also been influenced by Masculinity Studies, Postcolonial theory, and the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas. He has a special interest in teaching the works of Joyce, Conrad, Shaw, Crane, Wilde, Virginia Woolf, Auden, Hemingway, Robert Lowell, V.S. Naipaul, Philip Larkin, and the Holocaust writings of Primo Levi, Aharon Appelfeld, and André Schwarz-Bart. He has published on Neil DavisonJoyce, George Moore, Flann O’Brien, George du Maurier, W.B. Yeats, J. M. Synge, Schwarz-Bart, Philip Roth and others in such journals as Journal of Modern Literature, James Joyce Quarterly, Clio, Literature and Psychology, Jewish Social Studies, and Textual Practice. He has also placed poetry in Ironwood, Small Pond, Cimarron Review, Abraxas, West Branch, and other small-press magazines. His monograph, James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity: Culture, Biography, and “the Jew” in Modernist Europe (Cambridge University Press, 1996; paper edition 1998), examines Joyce’s career-long interest in European Jewry and 19th-century forms of anti-Semitism. Another monograph, Jewishness and Masculinity from the Modern to the Postmodern was published by the Routledge Studies in 20th-Century Literature series in 2010. He is presently at work on a critical biography of André and Simone Schwarz-Bart that focuses on race and gender in the collaborative expression of their Jewish and Afro-Caribbean identities.


Lisa Ede

Lisa Ede
Professor of English

Lisa Ede has been teaching rhetoric and writing at OSU since 1980.  Her research interests include rhetorical theory and practice; current composition theory; new media and new literacies; and feminist, cultural, and critical pedagogical studies. Ede has authored, coauthored, edited, or coedited eight books:  Writing Together:  Collaboration in Theory and Practice (with Andrea Lunsford 2011);  The Academic Writer:  A Brief Guide for Students (2008, 2011);  Situating Composition:  Composition Studies and the Politics of Location Lisa Ede(2004);  Selected Essays of Robert J. Connors (with Andrea Lunsford 2003);  On Writing Research:  The Braddock Award Essays, 1975-1998 (1999);  Singular Texts/Plural Authors:  Perspectives on Collaborative Writing (with Andrea Lunsford 1990);  Work in Progress:  A Guide to Academic Writing and Revising (1989, 1992, 1995, 1998, 2001, 2004);  and Essays on Classical Rhetoric and Modern Discourse (with Robert Connors and Andrea Lunsford 1984).  Her scholarly work has been recognized with awards for outstanding research from the Modern Language Association, Conference on College Composition and Communication, and the International Writing Center Association.


Evan Gottlieb

Evan Gottlieb
Associate Professor of English

Evan Gottlieb specializes in British literature of “the long eighteenth century” and critical theory. He holds the MA and PhD from University at Buffalo, SUNY, and the BA from McMaster University, Canada. He is the author of two books -- Feeling British: Sympathy and National Identity in Scottish and English Writing, 1707-1832 (Bucknell University Press, 2007) and Walter Scott and Contemporary Theory (Bloomsbury Academic, 2013) -- Evan Gottlieband the co-editor of two others:  Approaches to Teaching Scott’s Waverley Novels (MLA, 2009) and Representing Place in British Literature and Culture, 1660-1830: From Local to Global (Ashgate, 2013). He is currently completing another monograph, Romantic Globalism: British Literature and Modern World Order, 1750-1830, as well as preparing a new Norton Critical Edition of Tobias Smollett’s classic novel The Expedition of Humphry Clinker. He serves on the Editorial Board of the journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction, is a founding member of the OSU Theory Reading Group, and a current member of the MLA’s Scottish Literature Discussion Group executive board.


Anita Helle

Anita Helle
Professor of English
Director, School of Writing, Literature, and Film

Anita Helle’s cross-disciplinary research interests lie in literacy and pedagogy, 20/21st century gender and cultural theory, medical humanities, and 20th/21st century American women writers. Her collection of essays on Sylvia Plath, The Unraveling Archive: Essays on Sylvia Plath was published by Anita Hellethe University of Michigan Press in 2007. Her recent scholarship has appeared in Feminist Studies, College Communication and Composition, American Literary Scholarship, American Literature, The Oxford Handbook of the Elegy (ed. Karen Weisman), and the Norton Reader of Feminist Literary Criticism and Theory, ed. Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar. In 2010-11, she received the Meyerson Fellowship from the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center for her current project on literature, photography, and the changing shapes of literary authorship in the mid-20th century. She regularly teaches courses that align with her interests in archival/material research on American women writers, women and literature (Virginia Woolf), histories of reading and literacy, and literature and medicine. She is past recipient of a CLA Research Award (2008), the Burlington Northern OSU Teaching Award (1995), and the Hovland Service Award (2004).


Jon Lewis

Jon Lewis
Professor of English

Jon Lewis is a professor in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film at Oregon State University where he has taught film and cultural studies since 1983. He has published eight books: The Road to Romance and Ruin: Teen Films and Youth Culture, which won a Choice Magazine Academic Book of the Year Award; Whom God Wishes to Destroy … Francis Coppola and the New Jon LewisHollywood; The New American Cinema; Hollywood v. Hard Core: How the Struggle over Censorship Saved the Modern Film Industry, a New York Times New and Noteworthy paperback; The End of Cinema as We Know It: American Film in the Nineties, American Film: A History, Looking Past the Screen: Case Studies in American Film History and for the British Film Institute’s Film Classics series, The Godfather.

Professor Lewis has appeared in two theatrically released documentaries on film censorship: Inside Deep Throat (Fenton Bailey, 2005) and This Film is Not Yet Rated (Kirby Dick, 2006). Between 2002 and 2007, Professor Lewis was editor of Cinema Journal and had a seat on the Executive Council of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies.


Jinying Li

Jinying Li
Assistant Professor of English

Jinying Li studies film, animation, and digital culture in the current transnational/trans-media context, with specialization in contemporary East Asia. Her teaching and research interests include Asian cinema, anime (Japanese animation), otaku (geek) culture, participatory fandom, piracy networks, and trans-media interfaces. Her current book project, titled Global Geekdom, interrogates various aspects of anime and otaku culture, including fandom activities, peer-to-peer global circulations, and narrative/visual aesthetics, as the cultural manifestation of a fast rising global geekdom movement under the techno-economic conditions of the information age. Another project she has been engaged with is examining the cultural practice of media piracy along the emergence of a digital generation—dubbed “D-Generation” —in contemporary China. Her essays on anime, piracy, digital media, and Asian films have been published in Mechademia, The International Journal of Communication, and Film International, and will appear in a forthcoming issue of Inter-Asia Cultural Studies.    She received her BA from Peking University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Cinema Studies at New York University.

Jinying is also a filmmaker who has worked on animations, feature films, and documentaries. Two documentary series that she recently produced, Fashion Expression (2011) and Creative Future (2012), were broadcasted nationwide in China through Shanghai Media Group (SMG). In addition, She has worked as a journalist for Variety China, and has been a consulting curator for China Millennium Monument Museum of Digital Arts (CMoDA) in Beijing.


Raymond Malewitz

Raymond Malewitz
Assistant Professor of English

Raymond Malewitz teaches literature and science, environmental literature, and American literature of the 20th and 21st centuries.  His current book project examines the ways that real and imagined “maker” communities—environmental advocates, shade-tree engineers, post-apocalyptic survivalists, and so on—reinvent the myth of American rugged individualism through creative acts of object repurposing.  He is also at work on an essay that examines how photorealism and digital realism generate different forms of sexual and political desire.  His essays on Cormac McCarthy, William Gibson, Gwendolyn Brooks, and material culture have been published (or are forthcoming) in journals such as PMLA, Contemporary Literature, Configurations, and Callaloo.  He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in English Literature (2007) and a B.S. in English Literature and Biochemistry from the University of Michigan.


Rebecca Olson

Rebecca Olson
Assistant Professor of English

Rebecca Olson, an Oregon native, teaches courses on early modern poetry and drama (c. 1400-1700). Her ongoing research interest is the relationship between literature and the visual: the ways writers encourage readers and playgoers to engage the “mind’s eye.” She is the author of Arras Hanging: The Textile That Determined Early Modern Literature and Drama (The University of Delaware Press, 2013), which reveals the significance of Renaissance tapestries in the work of Shakespeare, Spenser, and other early modern writers. She has published essays in journals including Spenser StudiesWord & Image, and Modern Philology.


Ehren Pflugfelder

Ehren Pflugfelder
Assistant Professor of English

Ehren Pflugfelder teaches courses in professional/technical writing, new media studies, and rhetoric and composition. He is at work on a book project that examines connections between rhetoric, mobility, and technology. It argues that from the design of complex technical projects to our everyday use of mobility devices – automobiles, roadways, smart phones, etc. – we are immersed in a network of subtle arguments. Our understanding of those persuasive forces affects a host of issues including our health, wealth, and the environment. Recently, he has published essays on pedagogical devices in the post-historical university, transportation technology and user feedback, and phenomenology and gender in motorsport in journals such as College English, the Journal and Technical Writing and Communication, and the Journal of Sport & Social Issues. He holds a Ph.D. from Purdue University (2012), an M.A from Case Western Reserve University (2005), and a B.S.E. from Slippery Rock University (2001).


David Robinson

David Robinson
Professor of English
Distinguished Professor of American Literature
Director, Center for the Humanities

David Robinson teaches courses in American Literature, and has particular interests in Literature and Environmental Studies, Trans-Atlantic literary culture, and the classic New England authors such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Emily Dickinson. He has written several books on American literary and religious culture, including Emerson and the Conduct of Life (Cambridge University Press, 1993); World of David RobinsonRelations: The Achievement of Peter Taylor (University Press of Kentucky, 1998); and Natural Life: Thoreau’s Worldly Transcendentalism (Cornell University Press, 2004). He has been awarded a Faculty Excellence Award for Teaching by the Oregon State Board of Higher Education, and the Distinguished Service Award by the Ralph Waldo Emerson Society.  He also taught as a Fulbright Guest Professor at the University of Heidelberg, Germany in 1985.  He serves as the Director of Oregon State University’s Center for the Humanities, and is currently at work on the New England Transcendentalist author Margaret Fuller, and on the contemporary philosopher and literary theorist Stanley Cavell.


Elizabeth Sheehan

Elizabeth Sheehan
Assistant Professor of English

Lily Sheehan’s research and teaching interests are in late-19th and 20th century American, African American, and British Literature, with a focus on modernism, visual and material culture, critical race studies, and woman and gender studies. She is working on a book project, tentatively entitled “Modernism à la Mode,” which brings together texts, images, clothing, and fashion theory to argue that fashion defined the terms and reception of modernism’s pursuit of the new and its Elizabeth Sheehaninvestment in style as a way to reshape and reimagine identity, community, and political discourse. She also is completing articles on Virginia Woolf’s “frock consciousness” and on debates within the Harlem Renaissance about the politics of fashion.

Sheehan is the co-editor with Ilya Parkins of Cultures of Femininity in Modern Fashion (University of New Hampshire Press 2011), an interdisciplinary collection of essays that explores how fashion shaped multiple cultures of femininity and modernity. To that volume, she also contributed an essay on constructions of race and gender in the photography of James VanDerZee and the fiction of Jessie Fauset. Sheehan previously taught at Ithaca College.


Vicki Tolar Burton

Vicki Tolar Burton
Professor of English
Director, Writing Intensive Curriculum (WIC)

Vicki Tolar Burton does cross-disciplinary research and scholarship in literacy, rhetoric, pedagogy, and writing across the curriculum.  She is particularly interested in historical studies, archival work, and women’s writing and rhetoric.  Her book Spiritual Literacy in John Wesley’s Methodism:  Reading, Writing, and Speaking to Believe, was published in 2008 by Baylor University Press in their Rhetoric Vicki Tolar Burtonand Religion series.  Her articles and essays have  appeared in College Composition and Communication, College English, Rhetoric Review, and Across the Disciplines, as well as in a number of collections on the history and  theory of rhetoric, including Walking and Talking Feminist Rhetorics: Landmark Essays and Controversies (2010). She teaches courses in the history of rhetoric, the teaching of writing, English grammar, and literature.  In the summer she offers a writing workshop for thesis and dissertation writers across the curriculum.  Since 1993 she has directed OSU’s Writing Intensive Curriculum Program and is currently serving as Transitional Director of Baccalaureate Core Implementation which is updating the university’s general education curriculum.  For more information, see http://wic.oregonstate.edu/director.


Tara Williams

Tara Williams
Associate Professor of English

Tara Williams teaches and works on medieval literature and culture, with a particular focus on fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Middle English texts.  Her essays on Chaucer, Margery Kempe, and gender studies have appeared in journals such as Exemplaria, Chaucer Review, Modern Philology, and Studies in the Age of Chaucer.  She has also published on teaching the Middle Ages through multimedia in Pedagogy and on the role of the History of the English Language course in Tara Williamstwenty-first-century literary studies in Profession.  In her recent book, Inventing Womanhood: Gender and Language in Later Middle English Writing (Ohio State University Press, 2011), she examines how ideas about womanhood evolved in the wake of the plague and traces a new set of terms—including womanhood and femininity—that Middle English writers coined to explore those changing ideas.  Her current project considers the connections between magic, spectacle, and morality in fourteenth-century texts (including Sir Orfeo, Lybeaus Desconus, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and the Canterbury Tales); a related article is forthcoming in New Medieval Literatures.  She has been named the Morton W. Bloomfield Fellow at Harvard University for 2011-12.

Contact Info

Writing, Literature, & Film 238 Moreland Hall 541.737.3244
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